D-I-Y Repair Assistance Guide
HP 7100 Series Officejet Printers







Last Update: 5/09/2010
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replacing the scan head

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This page will walk you through the process of replacing the scanner head in your 7100 series HP Officejet printer. It is advisable for you to read through the complete instructions once prior to beginning any work, in case you should have any questions or find that you will need additional tools, etc. Before you begin, disconnect all power phone and computer connections to your printer.

 

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tools required

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Needed for disassembly are:
1. A cup or dish to hold screws or small parts
2. A small flathead screwdriver
4. A #10 torx-head wrench and / or
5. A long #10 torx-head wrench
(you can get a torx-head wrench assortment similar to the one shown here at most hardware stores for under $5.00)

NOTE: Be sure not to confuse TORX with a HEX / ALLEN wrench. Hex or Allen wrenches / fittings have six flat sides; TORX wrenches / fittings are 6-pointed, and sometimes referred to as 'star' wrenches / fittings.



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1. Pull the latches up, unplug & remove the ADF lid. This may require a little back and forth tilting of the long block between the tabs to get the plug started coming loose.



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2. Raise the scanner bed as you would for cartridge maintenance, then disconnect the hinged stays from the base. A flat screwdriver can be used to wedge under the round center bar to help them unsnap, or a narrow blade to spread the base tabs slightly works, too. Once disconnected be careful when holding the top section upright, as it can now flip backwards and come off. The next few steps can be best done with another person holding the top upright, or by working on a surface next to a wall where you can lean or brace the top upright.



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3. With the scanner bed now raised fully upright, 90°from base, remove the maintenance door fascia (face piece between the stays with the finger pull) by tipping tabs 'A' outward and sliding the fascia 'B' away from the base of the scanner bed.



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4. With fascia removed, you can now see some narrow openings which go up behind the control panel. We are interested in the 2 center openings marked here by red dots.



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5. In one of the 2 slots, there will be a screw at the bottom which needs to be removed. Be careful of the wire bundle which passes through this area. You will need a flashlight and a long #10 torx head wrench to reach this screw. This screw is not required- it was essentially used as a hidden "warranty breaker". When putting things back together; leave it out and save yourself the headache.



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6. Next, remove the 3 screws on the bottom marked here by red dots.
Keeping hinged stays flat against bottom of scanner, as shown here, lower the scanner bed down for access to the top. Because the stays are there, the top will not fully close flat, but should sit fairly stable in this arrangement..


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7. Using a thumbnail, butter knife (sorry Mom) or carefully with a screwdriver, begin to release the control panel fascia from the bottom, then tip upwards and out to remove. The button assembly will remain in place although it slides around as if loose.



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8. From the top of the scanner, now remove the 4 screws marked here; 2 at back corners and 2 in the lid hinge recesses. Next, lift and tilt the scanner bed top to remove it.



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9. The scanner head will normally be in it's home position on the far right, covering the motor. Do not try to grab the head and slide it, and most of all DO NOT touch or wipe the bulb or surrounding area (all the white/silver surfaces)!!



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10. Underneath the back scanner head rail you will see a blue rubber belt which loops on a roller. Pinch the belt on the side nearest the front and gently pull towards the scanner head, to the right. As you do this you will hear a clicking sound that might concern you, but don't worry; you're not tearing anything up. You will also see the scanner head begin to travel towards the center of the bed. Continue to pull using the belt until the scanner head has cleared the motor area, about 3 to 4 inches in from the right.



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11. The left end of the guide rail sits in a slot, normally held in place by the top half, and is free to be raised upward. On the right, motor end however, it is still attached but will allow for some tilting movement. First, tip the left end of the guide rail up, pivoting on the right end, bringing it high enough to clear the sidewalls as shown. As you see in the magnified insert, left, the left pulley is on a bracket under the rail which also loops around the end of the rail and keeps the belt in tension with a small spring on the end (at the tip of my fingernail). Press inward (to the right, down the length of the rail to ease the belt tension until it can be removed from the pulley (it may even fall off). NOTE: This is where keeping the rail close to the base is important; the lower to the frame you can hold the rail as you depress the spring, the shorter the distance to the opposite motor pulley. Once the belt is free you can set the rail back down, but may want to rest it on something such as a box of kitchen matches (or similar size) which keeps the end tipped up and aiding the next step.



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12. The scan head has a C-shaped channel on the end which wraps the guide rail and "snaps" on and off easily. With the end propped up, or held up with one handgrasp the scan head near the rail side and use a rolling motion, like opening Tupperware, to un-snap the head from the rail. Set the head down in the bed to free up a hand, and loop the belt up and around the rail near the motor to help slide it to the left, down the rail, moving up an over the motor pulley which sits closely below the rail. (Thus the need to keep the rail end tilted upward)



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12. Removing the FFC (flat flexible cable): See the "full size" image for a better look at how the FFC sits. These cables do not have a "plug" on the ends; they simply have bared contact surfaces on one side and slip into a slot with spring-metal contacts. The cable is stuck to the trough in the floor with double-face tape in the center, and you should keep the head close enough to the tray so as not to pull the tape or bend the cable. At the head the cable has one fold in it where it is clipped onto the top of the head, and seen looping back outand plugging into the back of the head. Grabbing both sides near the head, slide the fold out from under the clip. Next, keeping your fingers as flat as you can, pinch the cable near the plug-in and remove it with a slight side-to-side motion as you pull outward. For ease in re-installation, you may find it easier to attach the cable to the new head after the head is snapped onto the guide rail, giving you a little better control for leverage. Note also that the blue face at the end is the top when re-connecting.


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other info

From here it's just a matter of reverse-steps to put the unit back together. Once you are back to #8, closing the bed, this is a good point at which to test the system by setting the top w/glass in place, but not replacing all the screws yet, just a couple such as the two outer ones shown in #8, where you can then plug in the ADF lid and power it up to check all is working.

Should there be any problems or if you run into a question, you can send me a note with the form below.




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